Small Companies, Big Questions: Who really owned the shell company that became Kandi Technologies Corp.?

(Part two of a three-part series)

A few weeks after Kandi Technologies Corp. (Nasdaq: KNDI) went public by merging  with a moribund mining company, one of its promoters wrote that 4 million of the shares not held by insiders went “almost exclusively into sophisticated Chinese hands.”

That would have been news to anyone who scrutinized the Securities and Exchange Commission filings on the deal.

Those documents did not mention any sort of transaction that could have transferred so much stock from the Canadian investors who originally owned the mining company, Stone Mountain Resources Inc.

But a Sharesleuth investigation turned up major discrepancies in the share reporting by Kandi and Stone Mountain, which might explain how undisclosed parties came away from the 2007 deal with one-fourth or more of the Chinese vehicle maker’s stock .

Those shares later could have been sold on the open market for tens of millions of dollars.

As we reported in the first part of this series, the SEC filings on the deal said that the chief executive of Stone Mountain got as many as 3 million Kandi shares, or 15 percent of the total outstanding after the merger. Within nine months, however, he no longer was listed among Kandi’s largest shareholders, even though he never reported any stock sales or other changes in his ownership, as required under U.S. securities laws.

In addition, three people who were listed in earlier SEC filings as holding 1.25 million shares of Stone Mountain shares told Sharesleuth they never were investors. Three more told us they weren’t sure whether they owned the 1.15 million shares in their names. They added that they never heard about the merger and never got any Kandi shares.

Thus, an additional 12 percent of Kandi’s shares inexplicably wound up in the hands of other parties, who never were identified in the filings related to the merger. That raises the question of who really owned Stone Mountain, and who wound up with the 8 million Kandi shares issued to its investors.

When Kandi’s shares began trading in July 2007, the stock purportedly issued to Dodge and the other shell owners had a market value of roughly $20 million. Within three months, that value had doubled.

When Kandi’s shares reached a high of $7.25 in April 2008, the stock issued to the Stone Mountain holders would have been worth $60 million.

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Small Companies, Big Questions: Who secretly got millions of shares of stock in Chinese reverse-merger companies?

(Part one of a three-part series)

In the spring of 2005, a publicly held dating business called Universal Flirts Inc. gave up on love and did a reverse merger with a Chinese cell phone maker.

According to Securities and Exchange Commission filings, founder Darrell C. Lerner walked away with a 26 percent stake in the Chinese company, Orsus Xelent Technologies Inc. (formerly AMEX: ORS, now Pink Sheets: ORSX). By 2007, Lerner no longer was listed among its top stockholders, even though he never reported selling any of his 7.7 million shares and could not have liquidated large amounts on the open market because of a lack of trading volume.

When Orsus Xelent’s stock surged in the fall of that year — on a wave of publicity about big phone orders that never materialized — whoever held those shares might have been able to sell them for $20 million or more.

A Sharesleuth investigation found similar discrepancies in the reported share ownership of six other Chinese companies that a low-profile promoter named S. Paul Kelley helped to bring public in the United States between 2005 and 2009.

Our analysis of SEC filings found that tens of millions of shares allocated to the chief executives of the shell companies used in those mergers essentially disappeared – sold or transferred to other parties with little or no disclosure. Under U.S. securities laws, anyone owning 5 percent or more of a company’s stock must report significant changes in their holdings within 10 days of the transaction.

Based on share prices and trading volumes, we calculated that the people who wound up with the missing shares in the other six Chinese companies might have sold them for upwards of $50 million.

That total includes:

  • Shares of New Oriental Energy & Chemical Corp. (Formerly Nasdq: NOEC; now Pink Sheets: NOEC) that could have been sold for $8 million when that company’s stock price and trading volume were at their highest levels.
  • Shares of Kandi Technologies Corp. (Nasdaq: KNDI ) that could have been sold for $12 million to $18 million.
  • Shares of China Infrastructure Investment Corp. (Formerly Nasdaq: CIIC; now Pink Sheets: CIIC) that might have brought $20 million or more, depending on when and how they were sold.

Our analysis of SEC filings found that the people behind the shell companies used in the mergers used stock splits and other maneuvers to put millions of additional shares into the hands of unknown parties.

We believe the recipients of those shares could have sold them for a further $80 million.

In other words, the architects of the reverse mergers and their associates might have reaped $150 million from the deals — and possibly much more.

It appears that the SEC employees who review proxy filings and other submissions for compliance with disclosure rules did not notice the discrepancies in the reported share ownership at Orsus Xelent, Kandi and the other Chinese companies.

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